1. Recuperating Tibetan self-immolator faces jail threat, Financial difficulties

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    Phayul, September 17, 2012

     

    Dawa Tsering in an undated photo. (Photo/TCHRD)

    DHARAMSHALA, September 17: A Tibetan self-immolator, who is reportedly making good recovery from his burn injuries, faces an uncertain future coupled with jail threats and a slim chance of re-entering his monastery.

    Dawa Tsering, a monk at the Kardze Monastery in eastern Tibet, set himself on fire within the walls of his Monastery on October 25, 2011 during a religious ceremony. While engulfed in flames, he shouted slogans for the return of His Holiness the Dalai Lama from exile and the re-unification of the Tibetan people.

    The Dharamshala based rights group Tibetan Centre for Human Rights and Democracy in a release today said Dawa Tsering’s health condition is “quite well” and “longs to return back to his monastery” citing an unnamed source with contacts in the region.

    “But his future remains unknown and uncertain because he might not be allowed to return back to his monastery. Instead, he would be jailed at any time,” TCHRD said.

    In a latest picture released by the group, the severity of Dawa Tsering’s burn injuries is clearly visible.

    Dawa Tsering in an undated photo before his self-immolation protest.

    Soon after his self-immolation protest, Dawa Tsering had refused medical attention and pleaded not to be taken away by the Chinese security personnel.

    His family has been taking care of him at their home in Kardze.

    “But the family is facing financial problems as they struggle to meet Dawa’s medical expenses,” TCHRD said.

    Kardze has witnessed repeated protests since the mass uprisings of 2008. Tsewang Norbu, a 29-year old monk from Nyitso monastery in Kardze passed away on the spot after setting himself ablaze protesting China’s continued occupation of Tibet and demanding the return of His Holiness the Dalai Lama from exile on August 15, 2011.

    A few months later in November, Palden Choetso, a 35-year old Tibetan nun from the Ganden Jangchup Choeling nunnery in the same region, passed away immediately after setting her body on fire demanding the return of the Dalai Lama to Tibet.

    In April this year, more than 2000 Tibetans carried out a mass protest in Kardze, demanding the release of around 250 Tibetans who were arrested after Chinese authorities ordered the closure of a locally founded Tibetan organisation called the ‘Dayul Unity Association.’

    The Tibetan Parliament-in-Exile, which is currently holding its fourth session in Dharamshala, dedicated the entire proceedings of the first day to deliberate on the critical situation inside Tibet.


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