1. Love still stands when all else has fallen

    Comment

    Love knows no limit to its endurance, no end to its trust, no fading of its hope; it can outlast anything. Love still stands when all else has fallen. ~Blaise Pascal

    April 17, 2015.

    April 17, 2015.

  2. Prayer of Lovingkindness

    Comment

    roses in rainThe Buddha gave a beautiful teaching on the development of lovingkindness called the Metta Sutta (also known as the Karaniya Metta Sutta). I’ve adapted the words of the sutta to formulate them as an aspiration that can be repeated in a prayer-like way.

    In order that I may be skilled in discerning what is good, in order that I may understand the path to peace,

    Let me be able, upright, and straightforward, of good speech, gentle, and free from pride;

    Let me be contented, easily satisfied, having few duties, living simply, of controlled senses, prudent, without pride and without attachment to nation, race, or other groups.

    Let me not do the slightest thing for which the wise might rebuke me. Instead let me think:

    “May all beings be well and safe, may they be at ease.

    Whatever living beings there may be, whether moving or standing still, without exception, whether large, great, middling, or small, whether tiny or substantial,

    Whether seen or unseen, whether living near or far,

    Born or unborn; may all beings be happy.

    Let none deceive or despise another anywhere. Let none wish harm to another, in anger or in hate.”

    Just as a mother would guard her child, her only child, with her own life, even so let me cultivate a boundless mind for all beings in the world.

    Let me cultivate a boundless love for all beings in the world, above, below, and across, unhindered, without ill will or enmity.

    Standing, walking, seated, or lying down, free from torpor, let me as far as possible fix my attention on this recollection. This, they say, is the divine life right here.”

    Translated and adapted by Bodhipaksa from the Pali Metta Sutta.
    Source: http://www.wildmind.org

     

  3. A flower is made of several elements

    Comment

    If you are an organic gardener, you know that a flower is made of several elements that may be called non-flower elements: the sunshine, the cloud, the minerals and the seed. And among the non-flower elements, there is the element compost… garbage. The garden always produces garbage.

    If you are an organic gardener, you know how to handle the garbage. You know the techniques of transforming the garbage back into compost and into flowers. You don’t have to throw away anything at all. So, the energy of fear, of anger should be considered to be the garbage. Let it be produced, because it can become the art of mindful living.

    So, now we should learn how to handle the garbage in us, namely, craving, anger, fear and despair. We should not be afraid of the garbage in us if we know how to transform it back into joy, into peace. ~Thich Nhat Hanh

    April 16, 2015

    April 16, 2015

  4. Stand on your own two feet

    Comment

    Don’t ever let anyone break your soul. You have to stand on your own two feet and fight. There are those who would do anything to see you fall. Never give them the satisfaction. Hold your head up high. Put a smile on you face, and stand your ground. ~Unknown

    Devils Thumb - Lake Louise Alberta. Photo credit: Randy Neufeldt

    Devils Thumb – Lake Louise Alberta. Photo credit: Randy Neufeldt

  5. If you keep going…

    Comment

    Making one person smile can change the world maybe not the whole world, but their world. ~Unknown

    Sometimes life is like a dark tunnel. Though you can not always see the light at the end, if you keep going you will eventually get to a better place. ~Uncle Iroh

    Chinese Lanterns. Photo credit: Randy Neufeldt

    Chinese Lanterns. Photo credit: Randy Neufeldt

  6. Dhammakaya prayer

    Comment

    The Dhammakāya Movement is a Buddhist movement founded in 1916 by the Thai meditation master Phra Mongkolthepmuni (1885-1959) – the late abbot of Wat Paknam Bhasicharoen, Thonburi. The movement is primarily represented today by its non-profit foundation, the Dhammakaya Foundation, and the Wat Phra Dhammakaya temple in Pathum Thani Province, Thailand.

    It has many doctrinal elements to distinguish it from conventional Theravāda Buddhism and in some respects resembles schools of Mahāyāna Buddhism. The Dhammakāya school of meditation is marked by its literal interpretation of Buddhist technical terms, (including the term dhammakāya) in their physical meaning, as described by Phra Mongkolthepmuni. Many sermons of Phra Mongkolthepmuni himself can be traced back to some schools of meditation in Southeast Asia preserved only in ancient meditation manuals.

    Following the death of Phra Monkolthepmuni, the Foundation’s work was continued by his disciple, Khun Yay Mahā Ratana Upāsikā Chandra Khonnokyoong. In 1970, a temple, called Wat Phra Dhammakaya, was constructed as a home for the movement. Located in Khlong Luang, Pathum Thani Province, the temple was intended to become an international center for the study of meditation.

  7. Wind and breeze

    Comment

    Painful as it may be, a significant emotional event can be the catalyst for choosing a direction that serves us more effectively. Look for the learning. ~Louisa May Alcott

    There are no random acts. We are all connected. You can no more separate one life from another than you can separate a breeze from the wind. ~Mitch Albom

    Jendhamuni - April 15, 2015.

    Jendhamuni – April 15, 2015.

  8. The sun will shine

    Comment

    Live for today, not for tomorrow. Be of good cheer don’t stress about sorrow. Rain will come, the sun will shine, remember above all you are one of a kind… ~Unknown

    TransAlta Inlet at Wabamun Lake. Photo credit: Randy Neufeldt

    TransAlta Inlet at Wabamun Lake. Photo credit: Randy Neufeldt

  9. Sunshine is to flowers

    Comment

    What sunshine is to flowers, smiles are to humanity.
    They are but trifles, to be sure, but scattered along life’s
    pathway the good they do is inconceivable.
    ~Joseph Addison

    Daffodils. Photo credit: Randy Neufeldt

    Daffodils. Photo credit: Randy Neufeldt

  10. Learn from it and let go

    Comment

    Forgive the past. It is over. Learn from it and let go. People are constantly changing and growing. Do not cling to a limited, disconnected, negative image of a person in the past. See that person now. Your relationship is always alive and changing. ~Brian L. Weiss

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Live & Die for Buddhism

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Maha Ghosananda

Maha Ghosananda

Supreme Patriarch of Cambodian Buddhism (5/23/1913 - 3/12/07). Forever in my heart...

Problems we face today

jendhamuni pink scarfnature

Of the many problems we face today, some are natural calamities and must be accepted and faced with equanimity. Others, however, are of our own making, created by misunderstanding, and can be corrected...

Major Differences

Major Differences in Buddhism

Major Differences in Buddhism: There is no almighty God in Buddhism. There is no one to hand out rewards or punishments on a supposedly Judgement Day ...read more

My Reflection

My Reflection

This site is a tribute to Buddhism. Buddhism has given me a tremendous inspiration to be who and where I am today. Although I came to America at a very young age, however, I never once forget who I am and where I came from. One thing I know for sure is I was born as a Buddhist, live as a Buddhist and will leave this earth as a Buddhist. I do not believe in superstition. I only believe in karma.

A Handful of Leaves

A Handful of Leaves

Tipitaka: The pali canon (Readings in Theravada Buddhism). A vast body of literature in English translation the texts add up to several thousand printed pages. Most -- but not all -- of the Canon has already been published in English over the years. Although only a small fraction of these texts are available here at Access to Insight, this collection can nonetheless be a very good place to start.